Style Guide

Introduction

ARC Flight Map

Using the ARC Brand

About ARC

ARC

ARC stands for Airlines Reporting Corporation. The name "ARC" stands alone, unless "Airlines Reporting Corporation" is required for necessary context. The name is pronounced as you would say the word "arc," rhyming with "spark." We do not spell it out as A-R-C.

ARC Quick Description

ARC provides innovative distribution, data and payment solutions to the air travel industry. We connect airlines, travel agencies and technology providers to do business together more effectively and create a better experience for travelers.

ARC Elevator Speech

ARC provides flexible distribution solutions and the world’s most comprehensive air travel data, helping airlines and travel agencies connect, grow and thrive. ARC accelerates business growth for its customers by delivering trusted products and services built on future-proofed technology. By fostering industrywide collaboration, ARC forges connections across the global air travel community to generate innovation and efficiencies that ultimately enhance the traveler experience.

ARC Boilerplate

An industry leader in air travel intelligence and omnichannel retailing, ARC provides platforms, tools and insights that help the global travel community connect, grow and thrive. ARC enables the diverse retailing strategies of its customers by providing flexible settlement solutions, innovative technology and access to the world’s most comprehensive air transaction dataset. In 2019, ARC managed more than $97.4 billion in transactions between airlines and travel agencies, representing more than 302 million passenger trips. For more information, please visit www.arccorp.com.

ARC Brand Language

The Masterbrand Framework

ARC’s masterbrand-led framework highlights four core components: brand essence, brand promise, brand equities and proof points.

Brand Essence & Brand Promise

Brand Essence

Forging Connections. Accelerating Growth

The brand essence is the distilled expression of the brand, embodying ARC’s core purpose

Brand Promise

ARC helps airlines and travel agencies connect, grow and thrive by delivering flexible distribution solutions, innovative technology and access to the world’s most comprehensive air transaction data.

The brand promise articulates the key benefits ARC delivers to its customers.

Brand Equities and Proof Points

Industry Connector

  • Strategic efforts to generate collaboration and efficiencies, and inspire relationship-building among industry players
  • Enhancing partnerships through an active and influential thought leadership position

Leader in Distribution

  • Trusted and reliable provider of distribution services, settling nearly $95 billion annually between airlines and travel agencies
  • Proven expertise in facilitating complex processes on a global scale

Global Source of Airline Data

  • The world’s most comprehensive air transaction data, representing more than 2 billion passenger trips per year
  • Actionable insights into macro-level trends and granular, micro-level details

Return on Innovation

  • Flexible and customizable technology services and data products engineered to maximize client and industry value
  • Built on future-proofed technology expertise to deliver high-quality, secure and cost-effective solutions tailored to customer needs

Mission, Vision & Tagline

Vision

To be the partner and platform every enterprise in air travel counts on to succeed

ARC’s vision statement conveys the pursuit of a shared image of success that inspires, motivates and guides people to work together. It reflects where ARC is going and primarily leverages an innovation and growth equity.

Mission

Advancing and unifying the global air travel community by delivering trusted solutions, proven expertise and flexible technology

ARC’s mission statement defines organizational efforts and focus to make sure ARC stays on target with its overall business objectives, as well as the company’s vision. It reflects why ARC’s business exists and its primary equity is partnership.

Tagline

The Intelligence Behind Air Travel

ARC’s tagline is a short, assertive and compelling statement that conveys the essence of the brand. The tagline is not meant to fully describe what ARC does; rather, it is used to inspire.

Voice

In order to ensure that both internal and external stakeholders are certain of who ARC is, it is important to operate with a clear, resounding voice. This requires having a consistent tone when communicating.

The ARC voice is confident, inspiring, intelligent and researched. ARC empowers the global air travel community, striving to always be transparent, trustworthy and approachable.

Because ARC is an objective, trusted voice at the center of the industry, our voice walks a fine line between authority and approachability. It’s professional, but not overly formal. It’s accessible, but not overly casual. We take care to maintain a voice that reflects our role as a trusted leader that consults closely with customers to meet their needs.

ARC connects the global air travel community to solve problems and discover new opportunities. ARC inspires its customers to build relationships and solutions that move our industry forward.

ARC’s voice stems from a blend of two brand archetypes:

Sage

  • Seeks truth
  • Sees the world objectively
  • Possesses unique information and is willing to share it freely
  • Provides course-correcting solutions based on objective analysis of actions and choices
  • Transparent, trustworthy, willing to be accessible, approachable
  • Listens and observes closely to gain insights and improve relationships
  • Examples: CNN, Oprah, The Wall Street Journal
  • Hero

  • Tough and courageous
  • Leads in times of uncertainty
  • Overcomes tremendous obstacles
  • Proactive problem-solver
  • Persists in difficult times
  • Rises to the challenge
  • Examples: Nike, the U.S. Army

  • ARC's Visual Identity

    Typography

    Just as important as iconography and use of color, is the use of unique typography to attach a deeper meaning to your writing and accentuate our storytelling. Our marketing materials pair the modern and clean design of Source Sans with the friendly Roboto Slab, a combination that reflects ARC’s authority and approachability. The standardized fonts Arial Black and Palatino provide easy-to-use alternatives for our general tools and day-to-day communications.

    Marketing Use

    For Sales Materials, Online Presence

    Source Sans Pro

    Light, Regular, Semibold, Bold, Black

    A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
    a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

    Roboto Slab

    Light, Regular, Bold

    A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
    a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

    General Use

    For Emails, Documents, Presentations, Web Fallbacks

    Arial Black

    A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
    a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

    Color Palette

    Our brand palette serves to underscore our brand history and unique voice. Grounded in strategy and insights, our palette communicates a sense of authority, intelligence, legacy, decisiveness and confidence.

    Primary Colors

    $arcteal
      PMS: 7711C (7712U)
      CMYK: 79, 21, 27, 0
      RGB: 24, 155, 176
      HEX: #189BB0 
    $darkblue
    PMS: 665C (295U)
    CMYK: 100, 92, 38, 46
    RGB: 12, 28, 71
    HEX: #0C1C47 
    $darkteal
      PMS: 3155C (3155U)
      CMYK: 83, 50 ,41, 14
      RGB: 49, 102, 119
      HEX: #316677 
    $pink
      PMS: 227C (220U)
      CMYK: 38, 98, 31, 7
      RGB: 161, 18, 100
      HEX: #AB035C 

    Secondary Colors

    $darkpurple
    PMS: 229C (7421U)
    CMYK: 55, 98, 47, 54
    RGB: 107, 28, 58
    HEX: #6B1C40 
    $green
      PMS: 376C (375U)
      CMYK: 47, 6, 100, 0
      RGB: 150, 190, 60
      HEX: #96BE3C 
    $coolgray
      PMS: Cool Gray 2C (Cool Gray 2U)
      CMYK: 16, 12, 13, 0
      RGB: 212, 212, 212
      HEX: #D4D4D4 
    $gradient
      PMS: 227
      PMS: 665
    
      linear-gradient(to left, #AF1C63, #002554); 

    Writing Style Guide & Best Practices

    Frequently Used Terms

    Abbreviations and Acronyms

    If using abbreviations or acronyms, define the full name on first reference. When possible, avoid abbreviations and acronyms that are not commonly known. Headlines and titles may include commonly used abbreviations, but the text should introduce the acronym’s definition in the first few sentences. Do not use airline codes as abbreviations in formal external content. "ARC" stands alone and does not need to be defined, except in special situations (e.g., when context is required, or in press releases).

    Incorrect

    1. ARC’s Board of Directors approved a number of changes to the ARA.
    2. ARC piloted its enhanced settlement capabilities with BA.

    Correct

    1. ARC’s Board of Directors approved a number of changes to the Agent Reporting Agreement (ARA).
    2. ARC piloted its enhanced settlement capabilities with British Airways.

    ARC Accreditation

    Capitalize ARC Accreditation as you would a product, but when referencing "accreditation" generally, or "ARC-accredited," use lowercase.

    ARC-accredited agency

    Use the hyphen, as "ARC-accredited" modifies "agency."

    Incorrect

    Expedia is an ARC Accredited agency.

    Correct

    Expedia is an ARC-accredited agency.

    Calls to action

    Sign In

    This is the preferred term for signing in to My ARC. "Login" is used to refer to the user’s credentials.

    Download

    Use only when the button generates a direct download. If there is one more step to be completed, use language like "Get the Report."

    Register

    Use this term when asking the user to register for a webinar or event. Avoid using "Sign Up."

    Subscribe

    Use this for newsletters or updates that you opt in to receive.

    Document Names

    When referring to general documents in a sentence (such as forms, calendars and applications), document names should be lowercase. Industrywide documents, contracts or reference guides are capitalized.

    Lowercase

    • For more information, view the ARC holiday calendar.
    • Please complete the attached cash security deposit program form.
    • To learn more, see the 2019 fee schedule.

    Uppercase

    • Please review changes to the Agent Reporting Agreement (ARA).
    • Information on chargeback management can be found in the Industry Agents’ Handbook (IAH).
    • The Debit Memo Working Group developed the Best Practices for Effective Debit Memo Resolution and Prevention, NDC Getting Started Guide.

    One way

    Use "one way" as a standalone adjective or adverb, but "one-way" as a compound modifier.

    Incorrect

    • One way ticket sales have remained steady.
    • Their flight to Paris is one-way.

    Correct

    • One-way ticket sales have remained steady.
    • Their flight to Paris is one way.

    Round trip

    Use "round trip" as a noun, and "round-trip" as a compound modifier when describing another noun.

    Incorrect

    • They took a roundtrip to New York and back
    • They took a round-trip to New York and back.
    • The volume of roundtrip tickets increased last year.
    • The volume of round trip tickets increased last year

    Correct

    • They took a round trip to New York and back.
    • The volume of round-trip tickets increased last year.

    Team names

    Use lowercase for team names, with the exception of formal points of contact such as the Customer Care Center and Airline Help Desk.

    Incorrect

    • ARC’s Marketing Team created the writing style guide.
    • If you have any questions about the tool, contact the customer care center.

    Correct

    • ARC’s marketing team created the writing style guide.
    • If you have any questions about the tool, contact the Customer Care Center.

    Titles

    When used in a sentence, capitalize a professional title only when it appears before the person’s name. If the title appears after the name, it is lowercase.

    Incorrect

    • Mike Premo is ARC’s President and Chief Executive Officer.
    • The video features an interview with ARC’s president and chief executive officer, Mike Premo.

    Correct

    • Mike Premo is ARC’s president and chief executive officer.
    • The video features an interview with ARC’s President and Chief Executive Officer, Mike Premo.

    Never capitalize a job title that stands alone, no matter how important it seems.

    Incorrect

    The President signed the bill.

    Correct

    The president signed the bill.

    Most job descriptions are not considered titles and are not capitalized: astronaut John Glenn, actor Zac Efron, teacher Nancy Hanson.

    Incorrect

    The event will feature a Q&A with Airline Pilot Sally Smith.

    Correct

    The event will feature a Q&A with airline pilot Sally Smith.

    Abbreviations

    Formal titles are those that denote a scope of authority, professional rank or academic rank: professor, judge, mayor, doctor, emperor. Remember, they’re capitalized when used with a proper name, but not when used alone. Most formal titles are not abbreviated when used with a proper name. Only a few titles can be abbreviated: Gov., Lt. Gov., Sen., Rep., Dr., the Rev., most military and law enforcement titles. Never abbreviate president or vicepresident.

    Courtesy Titles

    Both men and women are introduced by their first and last names — without a courtesy title — on first reference. Subsequent references use their last name only. Do not use courtesy titles (Mr., Ms.) unless they appear in direct quotations.

    Incorrect

    Ms. Jones will moderate the panel on airline distribution.

    Correct

    First reference: Rachel Jones will moderate the panel on airline distribution.

    Later references: Jones will moderate the panel on airline distribution.

    Transformation

    Because digital transformations are not exclusive to ARC, "transformation," should be lowercase.

    Incorrect

    ARC’s Transformation will increase efficiency and flexibility for the air travel industry.

    Correct

    ARC’s transformation will increase efficiency and flexibility for the air travel industry.

    Travel Agency

    To provide context to the reader, use the full term "travel agency" on first use. After that, simplifying to "agent" or "agency" is fine. Use "agency" when referring to the business. Use "agent" when referring to an individual selling travel.

    • The IAH, ARA and any official or legal documentation are exceptions, which use the term "Agent" to refer to contractual agreements with an agency.

    U.S.

    Use the abbreviation U.S. when referring to the United States.

    Formatting Dates, Times and Figures

    Dates and date ranges

    In most cases, spell out January 1, 2019 (or, if the day of the week is important, Tuesday, January 1, 2019).

    • TASF is an exception, which uses the MM/DD/YY format for period ending dates (PED 01/01/19).
    • Use a hyphen without spaces to indicate date ranges. For date ranges within the same month, only list the month once.

    Incorrect

    January 7-January 20, 2019

    Correct

    January 7-20, 2019

    January 7-February 5, 2019

    Decimals

    When using decimals, simplify as much as possible to suit the context. As a general rule, do not exceed two decimal places. Decimals can also be used to consolidate numbers in the millions and billions.

    Avoid

    ARC processed $4.969 million in credit card sales in December 2018.

    Good

    Good

    The consolidated dollar value of airline tickets sold by U.S.-based travel agencies increased more than 5 percent in November as compared to November 2017, totaling $7.1 billion vs. $6.8 billion.

    ARC processed $4.97 million in credit card sales in December 2018.

    ARC processed nearly $5 million in credit card sales in December 2018.

    Good, but could be simplified

    In 2017, the chargeback debit memo to credit card sales ratio decreased to 0.048 percent.

    Numerals

    When used in a sentence, spell out one through nine. Use numerals for 10 and above. Use figures for:

    • Charts, labels and graphs
    • Dates, years and decades (April 1, Class of '95)
    • Ages (3 years old)
    • Currency ($5, $0.50)
    • Millions, billions (4 billion, $50 million)
    • Plane designations (B-2 bomber, Airbus 330-200)
    • Decimals, percentages and fractions with numbers larger than 1 (7.2 magnitude earthquake, 7.1 percent increase)
    • Addresses (5 Sixth Ave.)
    • Dimensions and distances (4 miles, 8 feet)
    • Sequential designations (Page 1, ARA Section 6)
    • Time of Day (a 1 p.m. webinar)

    Phone numbers

    Do not use the U.S. country code prefix (1) in phone numbers unless it is necessary for an international audience. Only use prefixes when necessary for international numbers (such as a new participating airline that does not have an office in the U.S.). Phone numbers should include dashes instead of periods, with the exception of designed documents. letterhead and signatures.

    • In TAC: "Contact ARC’s Customer Care Center at 855-816-8003."
    • In TAC: "For inquiries, reservations and sales information, contact InselAir at +599-9-737-0444."
    • In an email to a European airline: "If you have any questions, contact 1-703-816-8000."

    Percent

    Spell out "percent" in a sentence (5 percent). The percent symbol (%) can be used to label charts and graphs.

    Time

    Use lowercase a.m. and p.m. with periods after each. When writing a time on the hour, just use the number without :00. When referencing 12:00, use “noon” or “midnight” for clarity.

    Incorrect

    The networking event begins at 7:00 pm.

    Join us for lunch at 12:00 p.m.

    Correct

    The networking event begins at 7 p.m.

    Registration opens at 6:30 p.m.

    Join us for lunch at noon.

    For timeframes, join the two numbers with a hyphen, without spaces. Only include one reference of a.m. or p.m., unless it spans both.

    Incorrect

    The webinar will take place Tuesday 1 p.m.-2 p.m.

    Correct

    The webinar will take place Tuesday 1-2 p.m.

    The training session will take place 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

    Time zones

    For webinars and specific events, use EST or EDT to reflect Eastern Standard Time and Eastern Daylight Time, respectively. When listing year-round hours (e.g., hours of operation or phone support), use ET to reflect Eastern Time.

    Grammar & Punctuation

    Amerpersand(&)

    As a general rule, ampersands should not be used. Instead, spell out the word “and.” However, the ampersand may be used in a headline where brevity is necessary for design purposes. It should not be used as part of a sentence.

    Capitalization

    Apply standard capitalization rules to content. Capitalize the first word of a sentence, as well as proper nouns such as names, products, organizations and industry events.

    Headlines & Titles

    Capitalize the first word of the title, the last word of the title, and all “principal” words (nouns, pronouns, verbs, adverbs, adjectives, subordinating conjunctions, prepositions used adjectivally or adverbially) and all words longer than three letters. This also applies to document, chart and PowerPoint slide titles.

    Incorrect

    Meet the customer of the future

    Meet The Customer Of The Future

    Correct

    Meet the Customer of the Future

    Ellipsis

    As a general rule, do not use ellipsis.

    Hyphens

    Use hyphens to join two words or create compound modifiers. Do not add spaces before or after a hyphen. Do not hyphenate adverbs ending in "-ly."

    Incorrect

    Friendship is a two way street.

    Expedia is a well known online travel agency.

    Correct

    Friendship is a two-way street.

    Expedia is a well-known online travel agency.

    Prefixes

    Generally, do not hyphenate when using a prefix with a word starting with a consonant. Use a hyphen if the word that follows is capitalized.

    Dashes

    Use em dashes (—) for emphasis in a sentence, or to set off a phrase. Use a space before and after the dash.

    Incorrect

    Transformation isn’t exclusive to technology - it permeates the entire organization.

    Transformation isn’t exclusive to technology—it permeates the entire organization.

    Correct

    Transformation isn’t exclusive to technology — it permeates the entire organization.

    Serial Comma

    Per AP Style, ARC does not use the serial comma. This means that in a series or list of three or more items, the final two items are not separated by a comma.

    Incorrect

    ARC helps airlines and travel agencies connect, grow, and thrive.

    ARC has office locations in Arlington, Louisville, Tampa, and San Juan.

    Correct

    ARC helps airlines and travel agencies connect, grow and thrive.

    ARC has office locations in Arlington, Louisville, Tampa and San Juan.

    Verb Tense and Person

    Use active verbs rather than passive wherever possible. Avoid first-person verbs in external ARC communications such as articles, notifications, blog posts, etc., unless the communication is from an individual (e.g., an article or column from a subject matter expert on LinkedIn).

    Avoid

    The brand and style guide was used by the entire company.

    We implemented enhancements to Memo Manager.

    Preferred

    The entire company used the brand and style guide.

    ARC implemented enhancements to Memo Manager.


    Web Style Guide

    Typography

    Documentation and examples for ARC typography, including global settings, headings, body text, lists, and more.

    Body Text

    Paragraph copy should be wrapped with <p></p> tags. Standard body font size is 16px.

    Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

     <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.</p>  

    Headings

    All HTML headings, <h1> through <h6>, are available.

    h1. ARC Heading 48px

    h2. ARC Heading 36px

    h3. ARC Heading 26px

    h4. ARC Heading 18px

    h5. ARC Heading 17px
    h6. ARC Heading 16px
     <h1>h1. ARC Heading</h1>
    <h2>h2. ARC Heading</h2>
    <h3>h3. ARC Heading</h3>
    <h4>h4. ARC Heading</h4>
    <h5>h5. ARC Heading</h5>
    <h6>h6. ARC Heading</h6>  

    Display Headings

    Traditional heading elements are designed to work best in the meat of your page content. When you need a heading to stand out, consider using a display heading—a larger, slightly more opinionated heading style.

    Display Heading 64px

    <h1 class="mainTitle">Display Heading</h1>
    <p class="byline">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
    Pellentesque varius bibendum ultrices. Suspendisse in orci vel nulla cursus vehicula.</p>
                

    Components

    Documentation and examples for ARC typography, including global settings, headings, body text, lists, and more.

    Buttons

    Use ARC's custom button styles for actions in forms, dialogs, and CTAs.

    Primary Button

    Learn More

    Secondary Button

    Learn More

    Primary Button Outline

    Learn More
    <a class="btn btn-primary" href="#" role="button">Learn More</a>
    <a class="btn" href="#" role="button">Learn More</a>
                

    Best Practices

    Modular Programming

    Code modularity makes code more maintainable and easier for debugging. When possible, modularize often repeated components in code for faster development and for better organization. This provides a way to reuse and export specific modules for other projects. When debugging code, modules can be tested individually to help pinpoint problems rather than testing a single file that could contain multiple bugs.

    Framework Agnostic

    Using frameworks on top of native languages can provide faster development for complicated projects. However, each framework used in a project should be strictly chosen based on project requirements and needs. For example, many enhancements to web pages can be easily made with JQuery rather than implemented with Angular. The overhead and setup time for Angular may not be needed for smaller projects and should be used only when necessary. To that point, using JQuery in a single app project that may have multiple views and states would not be the best option.

    GitHub Repositories

    The web development team uses GitHub for public repository storage and version control. Since these are public repositories, none of the code in any of the repositories any private company information. All code is purely front end code containing public information that will be viewable through the web. The GitHub can be accessed here and the webdev team page is here.